Wednesday, November 11, 2020

UGH! It's been a while since I've been here!

 We've been very busy here around the farm, out shearing, out in the hay field, and in the gardens. Despite Covid, we've been busy. The nice thing about farming is you have plenty to do without having to see people. Don't get me wrong, I like people, I just like farming better.


 Right now it is 68 degrees and I am taking a body break from cleaning out one of the gardens of all the dead plants. I've been meaning to, but other things distract me. :)


 I will take, and post some farm pictures later this week. Before we start putting everyone back together. Saturday will be 4 weeks since we started breeding. Yes, we are two months later than normal, but the lambs will be ready to go on other people's pastures when they leave here at 8 weeks. And, thankfully, ALL of our lambs are SOLD!!

I am out of here!! See y'all soon.

 

Monday, March 09, 2020

Fleece teaser

2 of last year's fleeces
Betty Horned Dorset
$10 plus S&H


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Ivory Dorset/Romney
$10 plus S&H





Tuesday, February 25, 2020

Coccidia

Unfortunately, it is that time of year here in NH that coccidia shows up.

Coccidiosis is a parasitic disease of the intestinal tract of animals caused by coccidian protozoa. The disease spreads from one animal to another by contact with infected feces or ingestion of infected tissue. Diarrhea, which may become bloody in severe cases, is the primary symptom.

My take away here is to keep your land, especially around the feeding stations, dry. 

Sporulated oocysts are resistant to adverse environmental conditions and can survive as long as one year in moist, protected environments if they are not exposed to freezing or extremely high temperatures.

Here is how to clean your animals yard (dogs), I don't know how effective it is for the sheep yard, but you never know. You could use the ammonia and water mixture to clean your feeders, and your boots when leaving the barn. I think I am going to put a tray with this mixture in it in the barn for people to walk in before coming in and after leaving the barn. We've always used bleach and water, but we will do this combo instead from now on.
https://www.hunker.com/13406013/how-to-treat-your-yard-for-coccidia

https://www.nadis.org.uk/disease-a-z/sheep/coccidiosis-in-lambs/


This is the best take away that I got from the following site.
Preventive medications must be used at least 30 days before lambing to prevent ewes from infecting their lambs and at least 30 days prior to weaning to help protect lambs during this stressful event. Additionally, the use of a coccidiostat at the right time in the production cycle does not replace proper hygiene but complements it.

https://www.purinamills.com/sheep-feed/education/detail/four-questions-to-ask-about-coccidiosis-in-sheep

Dogs and cats can get it as well. 
https://www.petsandparasites.org/dog-owners/coccidia/

It is not uncommon for very young puppies and kittens to contract coccidia, but the infection will usually go away without treatment. However, some animals do not fight it off on their own, and will require a vet's assistance. The number one symptom to watch for is bloody stool.

Just as a safeguard I think I will disinfect the whole barn with this product, walls and floors, the next time we strip the barn. I generally put lime down on the cleaned floors before putting down fresh bedding. Using yet another product might be going overboard, but if I can prevent the losses like we had last year, I am willing to try it. https://www.amazon.com/One-Step-Disinfectant-Cleaner-Deodorizer-Concentrate/dp/B00B9G3ZJM/ref=sr_1_4?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIop6akOns5wIVy5-zCh2ZDQSFEAMYASAAEgIbFvD_BwE&hvadid=390322337174&hvdev=c&hvlocphy=9002270&hvnetw=g&hvqmt=b&hvrand=566393309299692298&hvtargid=kwd-301777535918&hydadcr=27885_9997808&keywords=coccidia+disinfectant&qid=1582638208&sr=8-4

Saturday, February 08, 2020

I learned something new today

Kaopectate and Pepto Bismal are no longer (and may never have been) safe to give sheep for diarrhea. It was highly suggested by a number of people to use Kaolin Pectin instead. I will look when I go to the grain store today just to have some on hand.

https://vcahospitals.com/know-your-pet/kaolin-pectin

Different reasons/causes of scours/diarrhea in sheep and goats. https://www.sheepandgoat.com/scours

https://pipevet.com/kaolin-pectin

Kaolin Anti-Diarrhea Liquid is for oral administration control of non-infectious diarrhea in cats, dogs, horses and cattle.

Detoxifies, coats and soothes gastrointestinal membranes.

Helps remove bacterial toxins.

Helps prevent dehydration.

Comes in a palatable oral suspension.

I am not sure I'd ever need  a gallon, but $7.56 for a gallon is not bad.

Just something else to add to my sheep shelf. After 27 years of raising sheep, it does not hurt to learn something new. Even if it is not something I can use, but something I can share with another who needs it.

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